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Apple Varieties

There is a great variety of species of the apple tree being cultivated. Among the most popular groups of species being grown in Europe are Red Delicious, Gala and fuji from red apples, Golden Delicious from yellow and Granny Smith from green apples.

Apple Varieties

There is a great variety of species of the apple tree being cultivated. Among the most popular groups of species being grown in Europe are Red Delicious, Gala and fuji from red apples, Golden Delicious from yellow and Granny Smith from green apples.

Red Delicious

Red Delicious: Distinguished by their large, shinny and characteristically red fruit, these apples have a firm yet juicy and aromatic flesh and are ideal for cooking. This particular group has been grown in Greece for the past 50 years. They are set apart by their intense colour and flavour, but also by the fact that they can be preserved in the refrigerator for extended periods of time. Gala: This is a family of varieties which are very popular and widely consumed. They have an intense red hue and their flesh is yellowish, crisp and lush. It is one of the tastier apple varieties and the subject of extensive research, as it attracts a lot of the market’s attention. It matures in early August.

Fuji

Fuji: Perhaps the best known group of apples. Its maturation begins in the first days of October. A variety with a strong aroma, crunchy yet juicy, it is well-preserved while refrigerated and can be safely and pleasantly consumed 10 months after its being picked.

Gala

This is a family of varieties which are very popular and widely consumed. They have an intense red hue and their flesh is yellowish, crisp and lush. It is one of the tastier apple varieties and the subject of extensive research, as it attracts a lot of the market’s attention. It matures in early August.

Golden Delicious

Golden Delicious: A very popular variety, also known as “golden apples”, with a yellow/golden, crunchy and succulent flesh and distinctive taste.

 

Granny Smith or green apple or greening

Granny Smith or green apple or greening: A group of varieties with a characteristic green skin and large fruit. They are crunchy and more tardy and acidic than other varieties. Green apples were considered very innovative in the early ‘80s due to their colour and special characteristics. Today they are synonymous with a proper diet. They are picked at the end of summer and the first months of fall.

Cherry

There are more than 1,000 different varieties of cherries, of which roughly 20% are those with the greatest consumption. Many of these varieties are grown in Europe and in Greece. Greek cherries are considered to be of superior quality in the international markets. Especially beloved are the varieties cultivated in North Greece, heart cherries in particular, with their distinctive crunchy fruit and deep red colour. Important research on new varieties of cherries has been undertaken, aiming for large varieties with a deep red colour and crunchy “bite”. These new varieties exhibit other desirable characteristics as well: they are self-pollinating, resistant varieties that can be grown in even warmer regions.

Peach & Nectarine

In recent decades, peaches and nectarines were one of the fruits exhibiting the most dynamic development of new varieties. These varieties manifest a great range of characteristics with respect to their efflorescence period, their shape, taste, hue of their flesh and softening rate of the fruit. The early varieties maturate in the second fortnight of May, while late varieties in the first fortnight of September. Varieties may be classified as follows with respect to the key characteristics of the fruits: yellow and white fleshed peaches, nectarines and clingstones. Common yellow and white-fleshed peaches, as well as clingstones originate from subspecies Prunus persica L., while nectarines originate from subspecies Prunus persica L var. Nectarina. The picking of peaches may begin in May for early varieties and continues throughout the summer up until the early months of Fall, for late varieties.

Kiwi

The first varieties planted in Greece were Bruno, Abbot, Monty and Hayward, while the last one has almost completely dominated the fields, due to its size, yield and maintainability. Hayward Kiwi is the principal green variety grown in Europe. They were named after Hayward Wright who discovered them and also gave the fruit its common name, Kiwi. Their harvest begins in middle of August, while kiwis are available until late April-early May. New clones of the Hayward variety have been made available in recent years and have enjoyed great success. The yellow and red varieties have, however, stirred up interest since the dawn of the new millennium. In a market yearning for new products, these different varieties, offering an exotic aroma and colour, will cater for this demand.

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* The legal requirements and safety and health specifications posed by international quality standards are fully adopted and implemented during the production process for European fruits in Greece, while companies possess of compliance certificates with respect to AGRO 2, GLOBAL GAP, BRC, IFS and ISO 22000 standards.

Apple


Why is it good for you?

There are multiple benefits from eating apples, as they provide a significant variety of vitamins to human organism. Nutritional information for an apple (100 g) Calories 52 kcal Sodium 1 mg Potassium 107 mg Total carbohydrates 14 g Fiber 2.4 g Sugars 10 g Protein 0.3 g Vitamin A 1% of RDI Vitamin C 7% of RDI Magnesium 1% of RDI Source: USDA Food Data Central Reference Daily Intake (RDI)

Cherry


Why is it good for you?

Having a characteristic red color, cherries provide a significant variety of vitamins to the human organism. Nutritional information for one serving of cherries (100 g) Calories 50 kcal Potassium 173 mg Sodium 3 mg Total carbohydrates 12 g Fiber 1.6 g Sugars 8 g Proteins 1 g Vitamin A 25% of RDI Vitamin C 16% of RDI Magnesium 2% of RDI Source: USDA Food Data Central Reference Daily Intake (RDI)

Kiwi


Why is it good for you?

Just one kiwi fruit is enough to cater for our daily needs in vitamin C. Nutritional information for a kiwi (100 g) Calories 61 kcal Fat 0.5 g Sodium 3 mg Total carbohydrates 15 g Fiber 3 g Sugars 9 g Proteins 1.1 g Vitamin A 1% of RDI Vitamin C 154% of RDI Magnesium 4% of RDI Source: USDA Food Data Central Reference Daily Intake (RDI).

Nectarine


Ideal for those caring for their diet, since they are low in calories and rich in vitamins, peach and nectarines are an important source of fibers, vitamin C and antioxidants. They are also rich in potassium thus keeping the nervous system in good shape. Thanks to the complex of vitamins they offer, they reinforce the immune system.

Peach


Why are they good for you?

Ideal for those caring for their nutrition, peaches and nectarines provide a significant variety of vitamins to the human organism. Nutritional information for a peach (100 g) Calories 39 kcal Fat 0.3 g Potassium 190 mg Total carbohydrates 10 g Fiber 1.5 g Sugars 8 g Protein 0.9 g Vitamin A 6% of RDI Vitamin C 11% of RDI Magnesium 2% of RDI Source: USDA Food Data Central Reference Daily Intake (RDI) Nutritional information for a nectarine (100 g) Calories 44 Fat 0.3 g Potassium 201 mg Total carbohydrates 11 g Fiber 1.7 g Sugars 8 g Proteins 1.1 g Vitamin A 6% of RDI Vitamin C 9% of RDI Magnesium 2% of RDI Source: USDA Food Data Central Reference Daily Intake (RDI)

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